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Eczema

Difference Between Rash and Eczema

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Image is from Prezerve.com

Eczema,is a reaction to an external or internal allergen stimulus. There are listed, according to the Eczema Association at least eight various kinds of eczema, and each type of eczema warrants a different healing option.

Understanding Eczema

Eczema considered chronic and long-term forms red, scaly, itchy patches on the skin that can range from mild to more severe.

The itching that develops can cause eczema can get so severe that the areas start to bleed. Intense skin scratching, in turn, places you at risk for secondary skin infections.

Eczema develops anywhere on the body, such as the face, arms, neck, legs, and chest. Symptoms vary from person to person. Eczema is migratory and frequently does not attack the same part of your body.

Eczema at its worse looks bad to other people to the point that people think you have a condition that they can catch. Eczema is not a contagious disease, but puts you in a heartbreaking dilemma.

Eczema is found to be hereditary or stems from an allergic reaction to some substance, and your doctor determines which type of eczema is bothering you, what triggers your eczema, and what healing methods are best to eliminate your eczema problem.

Eczema is a common problem in today’s society with many people like you trying to conquer its effects.There are no medical options that eliminate eczema in its entirety, so the goal is to manage this disease and keep it at bay.

Once a baby is said to have eczema, the chances are that this condition follows them as they grow and remains with them into the adult years. You do not have to have eczema as a child to develop it in your adult years.

If you experience any or maybe all of the following symptoms, you may be dealing eczema. Your doctor must determine which type and what health care options to use.

  • Patches of red skin
  • Skin that is dry and sensitive to touch
  • Notices dark patches of skin
  • Skin areas take on a rough, scaly look
  • You rusting on the top outer layer of skin
  • Have areas of swelling

Eczema is hard to deal with because when you think you have eliminated this condition it flare-ups once again.

Rash

You can develop a rash from an unlimited number of sources such as the environment, medication, cleaning supplies, stress, heat, cold, fevers, pet hair, food sources, and more.

Sometimes you may develop a rash without any indication of why or how the rash developed. In all instances, you just have to wait for it to disappear. No one can catch a rash from you.

A rash, not considered a chronic condition is short-term. General signs and symptoms include changes to the skin in color, appearance, or texture.

A rash can develop any place on the body at any time. A rash stems from your skin coming in contact with an external allergen or when you ingest something causing an allergic reaction, such as a drug or food you know you have an allergy. You have a rash if you notice,

  • Changes in skin color
  • Warmth to the area
  • Bumpy areas or hives
  • Chapped skin
  • Dry, cracked skin
  • Blistered skin

Types of rashes are extensive and varied. You may know what caused your rash, such as, you are allergic to fish and you eat fish, or you have a fever of over 101 degrees, or you were in the sun too long. Certain conditions cause rashes such as the chickenpox and measles.

There are over-the-counter preparations to eliminate itchy skin such as antihistamine pills like Benadryl and itch-relieving creams.

 

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Treatment for Eczema

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Image is from Wonder Wardrobes

Eczema is a skin condition caused by inflammation. When diagnosed with eczema, it is important to keep your symptoms under control. Knowing what triggers your outbreaks are vital so that you can prevent them. Some common triggers are stress, allergens, irritants, and dry skin.

What You Can Do

Most cases of eczema are manageable with a proper skin care routine. The following practices will help you control your eczema symptoms:

  • Establish a Daily Skin Care Routine – This is sometimes in conjunction with prescription therapy. Try not to miss any treatments so that your eczema doesn’t flare.
  • Be Aware of your Stressors – Avoid as many stressful situations that you can, and learn stress management techniques to help you with the ones you can’t. You can learn these techniques from a doctor or psychologist.
  • Try Not to Scratch or Rub your Skin – Be aware of what materials or substances that irritate your skin and avoid them. Avoid itchy fabrics, like wool, and dress in soft, breathable clothing.

Treatments and Medications

There are many different options available to treat your eczema. These include:

  • Over-the-counter (OTC) remedies
  • Medications available by prescription.
  • Phototherapy
  • Alternative therapies

The Most Common Treatments

  • OTC Products – These are medications and products that you can buy without a prescription. They include mineral oil, tar-based products, petroleum jelly, and gentle cleansers that do not contain soap. These treatments moisturize, treat symptoms of itching, and gently cleanse your skin to avoid infection.
  • Prescription Medications – Your doctor can prescribe systemic oral drugs, topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs), and topical corticosteroids.
  • Bathing – This is one of the most effective ways to treat your dry skin. Soaking in a warm bath is very therapeutic. You can add one of the following items to your bath water to treat your specific symptoms: baking soda, oatmeal, salt, vinegar, or bleach. Gently pat your skin dry with a soft towel and moisturize immediately afterward.
  • Moisturizing – If your skin gets too dry, your symptoms can flare. Washing without moisturizing afterward, harsh soaps, cold temperatures, low humidity, and even wind can dry out your skin.
  • Phototherapy – A special machine is used that emits ultraviolet B (UVB) light onto your skin. This increases bacteria-fighting systems in the skin, increases vitamin D production, and reduces inflammation and itching.
  • Alternative Therapies – Stress reduction techniques, supplements, acupuncture, plant-based topicals like coconut oils, biofeedback, and meditation have all been shown to reduce your symptoms.

Remember, symptoms of eczema are different for everyone and not everyone will respond to the same type of treatments. It is best to familiarize yourself with all available options and discuss them with your doctor, so you can customize a plan that works best for you.

 

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What is Eczema?

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Images is from TruKid

Have you ever noticed itchy red patches of skin on your child’s hands or face, or maybe noticed the same irritation on your elbows, neck, hands or knees? If so, the skin irritation you are seeing could be the result of eczema.

Eczema is a category of medical conditions that cause inflammation and irritation of the skin. Symptoms of eczema can include, dryness, itchy skin, redness or rash, scaly or thickened areas of skin.

Types of Eczema

There are many types of eczema and knowing the type of eczema is necessary to determine the best course of treatment. There are seven common types of eczema including,

Contact Dermatitis

This type of eczema occurs when you come into contact with an allergens or irritants, such as solvents, detergents, paints, bleach, smoke, or fumes. Most often it is found on the hand or other body part that touches the irritant and can causes redness, burning, and itching.

Hand Eczema

As the name suggests, this condition is usually found on the hand and is caused by a combination of genetics and exposures to irritants. It is one of the most common types of eczema and it can cause pain, dryness, blisters, cracking, and redness on the hand.

Atopic Dermatitis

This type of eczema is a chronic condition that develops typically in children starting as young as six months old. With this type you may often experience flare ups as well as periods with no symptoms. While the exact cause is unknown, atopic eczema comes about when your immune system goes into overdrive.

Neurodermatitits

Neurodermatitis is characterized by itching, discoloration, and thick areas of skin that are often the result of rubbing and scratching the affected area too much. If you suffer from this form of eczema you may notice these scaly patches of skin on your neck shoulders, feet, wrists, and scalp.

Dyshidrotic Eczema

Exposure to nickel, chromium salts, or cobalt can cause dyshidrotic eczema. You can also have this brought about by stress or allergies. This type of eczema is characterized by small and itchy blisters on the edges and soles of the feet and tips of the fingers.

Nummular Eczema

You can suffer from this type at any age and it usually occurs from either dry skin in the winter, insect bites, or skin inflammation. Like the other types, you may notice dry skin and itching, but this type is most identifiable by its round spots or open sores.

Stasis Dermatitis

This type of skin condition occurs due to changes in the pressure of the blood flow in your veins. Too much pressure in your veins can cause the blood to leak out into the skin causing scaling, swelling, redness, pain, itching, and in severe cases can lead to infection.

If you have symptoms of eczema, determining the type you have is important for you to receive the best possible treatment. Treatments can range from ointments, to simply avoiding irritants, and even chronic conditions can be well controlled if properly treated. If you have skin irritation, or other symptoms of eczema, contact your doctor today to determine your best course of treatment.

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Identifying Chocolate Allergies

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Image is from Huffington Post

Chocolate is a food craved by many, but someone cannot eat this sweet treat do to a food allergy. Food allergies occur anytime the body’s immune system reacts to a protein that it sees as harmful, when it is not. Those reactions can range from mild to severe. The only way to know the severity of the food allergies is with allergy testing or by eating the food and discovering bad reactions that follow afterwards. To help you identify if whether you have a food allergy to chocolate or not here are some of the symptoms that can occur.

Migraine Headache

One of the most common symptoms related with a chocolate allergy is a migraine headache. Migraine headaches cause pain in the front or sides of the head. They can cause blurred vision, nausea, vomiting, tingling in the arms and feet, body aches and chills and pain within the jaw and teeth. They come on suddenly, but typically occur after eating or drinking a food substance that causes it. The best way to treat migraines is with rest, drinking plenty of water, taking pain relievers, and avoiding the substance that causes it such as chocolate.

Hives or Rash

Skin issues such as hives or rashes are other issues people experience with food allergies. This is because the body is trying to rid the substance from the body through the skin. Sometimes eczema can occur as a longtime allergic reaction symptom if chocolate is eaten daily. To soothe and heal skin issues such as these, oatmeal baths and coconut oil seem to help greatly.

Difficulty Breathing

Wheezing, chest tightness, coughing and closing of the airways are serious allergic reaction symptoms that can occur with chocolate allergies. These typically occur within minutes of consuming the food, and most of the time need to be treated with an EpiPen and medical treatment from a doctor.

Swelling of Body Parts

Swelling and itching of the lips, mouth or tongue right after eating chocolate is a way of identifying a chocolate allergy. If this happens visit a medical professional immediately for treatment. Sometimes the hands can swell too, but it depends on the severity of the allergies.

Digestive Issues

Tummy troubles are another common sign of a chocolate allergy. Some of the digestive issues that you may experience are diarrhea, stomachache, and vomiting. Avoiding chocolate will stop these symptoms from occurring, but what will ease them are chamomile tea, papaya fruit, peppermint tea, antacids and antihistamine medication.

Runny Nose with Sneezing

A runny nose with constant sneezing while or after eating chocolate means it is probably time to stop eating this sweet treat. Antihistamines are the best treatment for easing these types of allergy symptoms.

Watery Eyes

Dripping watery eyes is an allergy symptom most suffer from with not only chocolate allergies, but with all allergies. Again, antihistamines and eye drops can help ease this allergy symptom. Sometimes itchy eyes can occur as well along with the watery eyes.

Bottom Line for Identifying Chocolate Allergies

Knowing these symptoms can help you identify these common chocolate allergy symptoms. Once they are known, it is best to avoid chocolate all together, but if for some reason, you do develop a severe allergic reaction go to the emergency room immediately for treatment. If there isn’t away to get to the ER call 911 immediately for help. After all, some food allergies without treatment can be deadly. If you are unsure if you have a chocolate allergy or not even after eating it and experiencing symptoms it is best to visit your doctor for allergy testing.

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Understanding Gluten Intolerance

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Image is from Doctor Doni

Gluten is a protein that is found in wheat, barley, rye, kamut, spelt, and other grains. A gluten intolerance does not necessarily mean you have Celiac disease. There are many people who cannot tolerate gluten that do not test positive for Celiac disease. Tests for Celiac disease include:

  • Biopsy of small intestine
  • Reticulin antibody test
  • Endomysial antibody test
  • Transglutaminase antibody test

Many of the patients who tested negative for Celiac disease do have results that indicate they are gluten intolerant, however, which is a good starting point to receiving proper treatment.

How to Test for Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance

The Gliadin antibody test is often positive when other tests, such as those above, are negative. While Gliadin antibodies will not result in a diagnosis of Celiac disease, they do indicate that your immune system is reacting against the Gliadin, which is a part of what makes up gluten.

Celiac disease is just another name for a condition called villous atrophy, which causes visible changes in the lining of your digestive tract. While villous atrophy can result from an immune reaction to gluten, it is only one possible result. In a nutshell, Celiac disease is just one type of gluten intolerance.

Other Tests for Gluten Intolerance

IgE and IgG are antibody tests for allergic reactions that can include numerous foods and food components. In this case, these tests are run to determine gluten intolerance. Most non-Celiac gluten sensitivity patients have elevated antibodies to:

  • Gluten
  • Gliadin
  • Barley
  • Rye
  • Wheat
  • Spelt

These patients usually feel much better after eliminating the foods they test positive for. In addition to several GI symptoms such as IBS, constipation, diarrhea, heartburn, bloating, or gas, patients with gluten sensitivity can also experience:

  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Eczema or other skin rashes
  • Chronic sinusitis
  • Arthritis

What if You Already Know You Can’t Gluten?

According to Dr. Stephen Wangen, co-founder and Medical Director of the IBS Treatment Centers in Seattle, WA, and Los Angeles, CA, there are many patients who determine, through trial and error, that they can’t eat gluten. And if you have already found this to be true and have stopped eating gluten, it is highly likely that any tests run will come back negative.

Treatment

The treatment plan for any type of gluten intolerance is as simple as it can be complicated: avoid gluten. It is complicated, because gluten hides in many foods that you would not think contained any gluten. One example of this is corn syrup. Corn syrup contains gluten and it is a very common ingredient in so many of our processed foods today. It is even most sodas, condiments, sauces, and ice creams.

Avoiding the list of grains above is the easy part, however, in order to maintain a gluten-free diet, you must read labels on every product you buy. It sounds daunting, but after a few trips to the store, you will have a good working knowledge of what you can and cannot digest. Then you will just have to read the labels on any food product you have never eaten before.

More and more grocery stores are now carrying a gluten-free line of foods and many of them are quite tasty. Again, you will go through a process of trial and error trying these new foods and determining whether you like them or not, but it is definitely worth it.

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