Toll Free: 1-877-335-2455
Fax: 877-889-9157

50 brain disorders

Signs of Alzheimer’s

WorldAlzMonth

Image is from Alzheimer’s Disease International

Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that causes a person’s thinking and reasoning skills to slow down. This disease is much more than becoming forgetful once in a while. For most people the signs start out relatively minor, and over time, the symptoms begin to progress. There are 10 warning signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s. People can experience one or more symptom and everyone will experience the symptoms to different degrees.

Memory Loss To the Extent That It Disrupts Your Daily Life

The most common sign of Alzheimer’s disease is memory loss. The memory loss associated with this disease is more serious than forgetting a dentist appointment or losing your keys once or twice. Most people with this disease forget things that they have recently learned. It is also not uncommon to forget dates and events. Finally, if you are constantly asking people to give you the same information again and again, it could be a sign of Alzheimer’s.

Trouble With Problem Solving and Planning

Many people with Alzheimer’s have trouble following plans. For example, if you are struggling to follow a recipe that you have made in the past, it could be an early sign of Alzheimer’s. Also, if you are typically great keeping track of your bills and suddenly your bills aren’t getting paid, you should see a doctor. Finally, concentration problems are a very common sign.

Difficulty Completing Familiar Tasks

Alzheimer’s makes it difficult for you to complete common tasks that you can usually handle everyday. Driving to familiar locations, handling normal tasks at work, and even remembering the rules to your favorite game can suddenly be difficult. As the disease progresses, you could start to struggle with using the microwave or turning on the television.

Confusion Regarding Time and Place

Alzheimer’s can make it difficult for you to understand time. Many people with Alzheimer’s disease believe that things from their past are occurring in the present. For example, you could be in the present, but think that things from your life 20 years ago are occurring now. It is very easy for a person with Alzheimer’s to get stuck in the past. It can also be easy for you to forget where you are. When you have figured out where you are, you can struggle to remember how you got there.

Trouble Understanding Visual Images

There are some Alzheimer’s patients who struggle with visual images. If you have trouble reading or judging distance, it is a sign of Alzheimer’s. Also, if you struggle to determine colors or contrast, it is also cause for concern.

Trouble Having a Conversation

If you have Alzheimer’s disease, it can be difficult for you to engage in a conversation with other people. In the middle of the conversation, you can forget what you were talking about, resulting in a long pause. Also, it is not uncommon to repeat yourself often. Finally, it can be difficult to find the right word for certain objects. When you cannot think of the right word, you may be tempted to make up a word for the object yourself. For example, if you cannot remember the name for a refrigerator, you might call it a cold box.

Frequently Misplacing Objects

A common sign of Alzheimer’s is misplacing things often. Many people with this disease will put things away in strange places. If you lose something and your loved ones ask you to retrace your steps, you might not be able to remember where you just were.

Alzheimer’s disease can effect your brain in many ways. A mind that was once clear can often become foggy and confused.

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Months

Map

Image is from Michigan House Republicans

Many people think that Alzheimer’s is just part getting older. Sometimes, it becomes comical when older people get forgetful. However, this is not funny because Alzheimer’s is not part of getting older. Instead, it’s a disease that needs to be prevented.

As a matter of fact, even those who aren’t that old can suffer from Alzheimer’s disease. Although this is not contagious nor inherited, it can still be epidemic in a way people are not aware how to avoid it. It is a lifestyle-based disease which can also be avoided by changing your lifestyle. There is more to teach about Alzheimer’s, and this is what Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Months strives to achieve every year in June.

Ways to Participate in Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Months

Learn About Alzheimer’s

The most important thing you should do in Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Months is to learn everything about Alzheimer’s disease and other brain disorders. You don’t have to wait for any scheduled seminar to do so. You can learn about it on your own for free by reading blogs, and other articles you can browse on the internet.

However, if there are some awareness seminars to be held in your local area, don’t hesitate to join and ask questions. You can also visit a specialist and ask about all that you need to know about Alzheimer’s disease.

Donate Cash

There are many organizations and associations that are actively helping people with Alzheimer’s, dementia, and brain abnormalities. If you have some extra money, you can donate cash to any such organization. This is because most organizations that help and care for people with brain disorders depend upon the generosity of the public.

Teach Others About Alzheimer’s

If you are already knowledgeable about Alzheimer’s and other brain diseases, you can teach others in your own little way by telling your friends and relatives about the ways to prevent Alzheimer’s. You can also blog about it and share information to your social media following, so that more people will become curious and interested to learn about it, too.

Volunteer for Alzheimer’s Campaign

If you really want to go the extra mile in participating Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Months, you can volunteer for the campaign and work with organizations or associations that propagate information.

Usually, campaign work for awareness month such as this involves organizing a series of seminars and forums. You can volunteer in any related associations or movement and help them organize or schedule such events. Along the way, you can also teach people more about Alzheimer’s.

Go Purple

Purple is the color of Alzheimer’s awareness campaign. You can dress yourself up with anything purple and encourage others to do the same. You may also go purple on your Facebook account by changing your theme to purple color.

In this way, many people will become curious about the color. Not only does it catch attention, but it also leads to explaining what it is all about. Why not go purple together with your family and friends?

There are many things to be learned about Alzheimer’s and other brain diseases, and this can’t be discussed in just one sitting. This is why it should take a month to campaign for it.

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

National Neuropathy Awareness Week

nero

Image is from Arizona Brain & Spine Center

The AANEM, Your Source for Neuropathy Information

National Neuropathy Awareness Week is May 12th – 16th yearly to bring to the forefront challenging brain disorders that affect millions of people.

The AANEM or American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine plays a vital part in the lives of people who suffer from over 50 various chronic diseases of the muscles and nerves. You may have one of many different muscles and nerve diagnosis and not know it.

The condition, which the AANEM focuses, plagues millions of people is neuropathy. The AANEM brings to light all of the early signs and symptoms of various illnesses and help people of all ages to deal with their brain diagnosis.

The AANEM states, “Neuropathy is the leading cause of disability in the U.S. Neuropathy is common, misunderstood, underdiagnosed, and misdiagnosed. Treatment for neuropathy is often inadequately treated.”

What is Neuropathy?

The human body’s nervous system contains the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. These two nervous systems are responsible for all voluntary and involuntary muscle movements. It is the peripheral nervous system that transmits signals to your median nerves, brain, spinal cord, and the remaining parts of your body.

If your nerves become damaged, they cannot send out the correct signals to muscle groups and vital organs for voluntary and involuntary movements. When your peripheral nerves become damaged, you may have peripheral neuropathy.

Neuropathy affects one or all of your sensory, autonomic, and motor nerve groups. Doctors can eliminate any of the over 50 brain disorders or slow the progression with early diagnosis and treatment.

Neuropathy Awareness

May 12th – 16th is the time where AANEM educates you and the public on neuropathy, signs, symptoms, risk factors, and treatments available. Currently, many people do not know about neuropathy, what it is, the symptoms, and treatments available.

The AANEM wants you to know that neuropathy is truly a debilitating disease process and is devoted to helping you, your doctor, medical providers, and the public tackle this problem during Neuropathy Awareness Month.

AANEM want you to know that researchers are working tirelessly in the battle against neuropathy through discovering new treatments, possible cures, and appropriate therapies.

A few common muscle and nerve disorders.

  • Diabetic neuropathy
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Bell’s Palsy
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Erb’s Palsy
  • Guillain-Barré Syndrome
  • Low Back Pain
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Myasthenia Gravis
  • Neck Pain
  • Pinched Nerve
  • Post-polio Syndrome
  • Restless Legs Syndrome
  • Sciatica
  • Writer’s Cramp

You may develop neuropathy from infections, viruses, or by contacting bacteria. HIV, shingles, and Lyme disease are three of the six conditions where neuropathy develops.

Signs and Symptoms

If you experience in your lower extremities and hands, weakness, tingling, numbness, and pain

Do you have Neuropathy?

As soon as you identify these signs and symptoms, your doctor may order some tests such as an EDX, Needle EMG, Evoked potentials, Creatine Kinase Blood Test, or an Ischemic Exercise Test.

Performing these tests on several nerves in the body help the doctor to determine if you have neuropathy. It is vital to get high-quality testing done as soon as possible.

If your body functions properly, your nerves continue to send electrical impulses to your muscles. Properly functioning nerve signals to your muscles are how you move without even thinking about what has to happen in your body.

If you have a muscle or nerve disorder, your nerves are not sending the correct signals to your muscles to move you properly.

If your doctor suspects you have a muscle and nerve disease, the AANEM stands ready to help you through in-depth education, videos, reading materials, focus groups, support groups, and much more.

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,